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Re:solution: Embrace,schedule and delegate

December 28, 2017

Why do we roll our eyes when we contemplate New Year’s resolutions? They are a moment when we’re honest with ourselves about a particular aspect of our lives that could use some improvement – be it fitness, punctuaity or an underwear drawer that could use an overhaul. Resolutions are an acknowledgment of a need to improve and grow and are often the root of establishing a personal vision. Honesty, personal growth and vision are all positive attributes so… why the long faces? A friend who is studying guided meditation suggests that the term ‘resolution’ puts a lot of pressure on us and we are disappointed when we ‘fail’.

 If we reframe the concept from an imposition to an intention, then we relieve some of that pressure and turn a negative connotation into a positive one.

Another way to reframe is to focus on the “solution” part of the word. The re:solution  is an opportunity to fix something that’s off and, since we can’t always find solutions ourselves, why not delegate part of the solution to maximize your chances of accomplishing your objectives? When you have a sore tooth, you call a dentist. So if your issue is fitness, call a trainer. Want to tackle pesky perfectionism? Book an appointment with a counselor. If you keep meaning to freshen up your home, call a painter. If learning a new language is languishing on your bucket list, sign up for a class. It doesn’t have to cost any money. If you want to clean out the garage, pick a date and ask a friend to help you out. You’ll have fun, spend time with someone you love and accomplish your objective. The act of delegating all or part of your resolution commits you to act on it. Do it now and you can be one of “those people” who love New Year’s Resolutions.

Tips for Successful Re:Solutions

  1. Congratulate yourself for your vision and commitment to personal growth
  2. Acknowledge that you are worth it
  3. Frame your resolution as a positive action and break it down into manageable steps. For example, if you have a health and fitness goal: walk daily; try a new vegetable every month; book time with a trainer; etc… (Studies show it’s more difficult to stop doing something than do add something new.)
  4. Enlist professional help: trainer, nutritionist, painter, counselor, teacher,…
  5. Keep it clear and simple and get it done early.

Just do it! You’re worth it! Happy New Year!

I’d like to know, what’s been your most successful New Year’s resolution? What do you think helped you accomplish your goal?

 

3 Comments leave one →
  1. December 28, 2017 1:44 pm

    Great post! I always look forward to goal setting for the new year!! One more thing that can help is 30 day challenges, you can do anything (well almost anything) for 30 days which is a great kickstart to a resolution!

  2. December 29, 2017 12:11 pm

    How about using the term “desire” in reference to a New Year goal? A wonderful, constructive post. However, “get it done early” is not always applicable to a work in progress and has a feeling of compulsion.

    • December 29, 2017 12:28 pm

      I see your point. In terms of getting it done early, you’re right that you may not be able to accomplish something in one fell swoop but small, early, meaningful ‘wins’ are important for successful change.

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